How to Configure Pine on Windows PCs

Initial Start-up 

When you start PC-Pine for the first time, the program will prompt you for certain information. That configuration data is written either to a configuration file on the IMAP server (the default) or to PC-Pine's configuration file (named PINERC in the directory you unpacked PC-Pine in), so you will not have to enter it every time. 

You should be prepared for the questions as PC-Pine can't really proceed without the answers. If you make an error in any of these entries, you can correct it in Pine's Setup/Config screen (type "S" then "C" from the Main Menu). 

Inbox 

When you read mail with PC-Pine, your mail is not delivered to your PC directly. Rather, email is delivered to an IMAP server which has been previously set up by your department/university/institution. When you first start PC-Pine, you need to specify where your INBOX is.
The syntax is this: {imap-server.domain}INBOX 
For most LPL users: {hindmost.lpl.arizona.edu}INBOX 

User-id 

This is the user-id part of your email address. 

Personal name 

Your name as you want it to appear on outgoing email. You may have spaces and punctuation in the name. 

Host/domain 

The "host" portion of your email address. This may be the full name of the computer where your inbox resides or your departmental or institutional domain if mail forwarding is set up. NOTE: You should not put the name of your PC as the answer to this question -- your PC is not where your INBOX resides. 

SMTP server 

Your PC does not have the software to interact with Internet email directly. It must rely on an SMTP server to actually send your message. You need to set this to the full name of the computer at your site which provides SMTP service. 

Example: Suppose the PC-Pine user is named "Joe User" and has the login/email address of "juser". At LPL, we take advantage of the general domain of "lpl.arizona.edu". He has set up his email so that email is delivered to his inbox on the machine "hindmost.lpl.arizona.edu". The main LPL Post Office's SMTP server is on the machine named "hindmost.lpl.arizona.edu". The PC running PC-Pine is on the campus network and is called "pc-joe". 

That person would answer PC Pine's configuration questions like this:
INBOX {hindmost.lpl.arizona.edu}INBOX
User-id juser
Personal Name Joe User
Host/domain lpl.arizona.edu
SMTP Server hindmost.lpl.arizona.edu
 

Email coming from the account would look like this:
-------------- Sample Email -----------------
Date: Mon, 16 July 1993 08:45:43 -0700
From: Joe User < username@lpl.arizona.edu>
To: Pine Development Team < pine-bugs@cac.washington.edu>
Subject: My First Message
 

Local Support Files 

The Release Notes (Press "R" on the Main Menu) contain a section on Configuration, including default file names and environment variables. In brief, PC-Pine uses the following rules for finding config and support files: 

1. The location of the PINERC is searched for in the following order of precedence:
a. File pointed to by PINERC environment variable
b. $HOME\PINE\PINERC
c. A file named PINERC in the same directory as PINE.EXE 

2. The HOME environment variable, if not set, defaults to root of the current working drive. 

3. The default for most support files (e.g. PINE.SIG and ADDRBOOK) is the same directory as the PINERC file. 

4. The support files (PINE.HLP and PINE.NDX) must be in the same directory as PINE.EXE. 

Descriptions of these files follows: 

PINERC 

The Pine configuration file. It contains all of Pine's configuration information -- much more than just the essentials listed above. There are comments in the PINERC to help you out. Also, PC-Pine comes with a sample PINERC you can use as a model. See the release notes for this version (they are compiled into the program) for more details. 

ADDRBOOK 

Your Pine address book. All the tools you need to manage the address book are in Pine itself, so you shouldn't need to worry about this. 

PINE.SIG 

Your signature file. If this file exists, Pine will automatically insert it into every outgoing message. You can specify a different name for this file in the PINERC if you like. 

NEWSRC 

The NEWSRC is your subscription list for newsgroups. By default Pine will create this file in the same directory as your PINERC, but will recognize it in your $HOME directory as well. You can specify a different name for this file in the PINERC if you like. 

MAILCAP 

The MAILCAP file is not required by PC-Pine for normal operation, but is the configuration file that can be used to help PC-Pine deal with types and subtypes of MIME attachments it doesn't have builtin knowledge of. The MAILCAP file is automatically recognized in either the same directory as your PINERC or the same directory as PINE.EXE. You can specify a different MAILCAP file (or files) using the MAILCAPS environment variable which takes a semicolon delimited list of locations. A sample MAILCAP, MAILCAP.SAM, is included in the distribution to help get started. 

PC-Pine will search your PC's Registry database for attachment handling information that cannot be found in the MAILCAP file. 

MIMETYPE 

The MIMETYPE file is not required by PC-Pine for normal operation, but is the configuration file that can be used to help PC-Pine apply the proper MIME type and subtype information to attachments it sends. The MIMETYPE file's location is the same as that described for MAILCAP above. A sample MIMETYPE, MIMETYPE.SAM, is included in the distribution to help get started. 

PC-Pine will search your PC's Registry database for attachment handling information that cannot be found in the MIMETYPE file. 

Local Directory for Folders 

Another important directory to PC-Pine is the location for local mail folders. By default, PC-Pine will create the directory $HOME\MAIL to use as the directory to store mail you save to the local disk. If the $HOME environment variable is not defined, PC-Pine will assume the root of the current working drive. This location can be overridden by changing or adding "folder-collections" definitions in PC-Pine's Setup/Config screen. 

Common PC-Pine Installation Problems 

Configuration settings aren't being saved 

This problem can happen if you run pine from one directory and then decide to move your pine directory to another location. PC-Pine stores certain variables, including the configuration location, in the Windows Registry (which you shouldn't ever need to manually edit). There are a couple of ways to go about removing or resetting the values in the registry. 

1) Run PC-Pine's registry value deletion command. This can be done by running: "< your pine directory>\pine.exe -registry clear" from the DOS prompt. You could create a shortcut to pine.exe and change the "Target" value to the above command. 

2) Tell PC-Pine where to look for the configuration file. Configuration information is stored in a file called the PINERC. With the "-p PINERC" option, you can tell PC-Pine the location of your pinerc. An example of this would be to run: "< your pine directory>\pine.exe -p C:\pine\mypinerc". Again, you can use the DOS prompt or the shortcut method explained in (1). 

Additionally, there is the "-registry set" option, which will actively set registry values to the current setting, and is therefore useful with the "-p PINERC" option. 

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