February 2016

DateEventLocation
Tuesday, Feb 16
3:45 pm
LPL Colloquium: Dr. Melissa Rice
Dr. Melissa Rice
Assistant Professor
Western Washington University

Mars through the eyes of the rovers: Imaging science from the MER-Pancam, MSL-Mastcam, and upcoming Mars2020-MastcamZ investigations

The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit and Opportunity rovers, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover, and the currently-in-development Mars2020 rover all have spectroscopic, multispectral imaging capabilities with their mast-mounted cameras, which can help constrain the iron mineralogy and distribution of hydrated materials on the surface. This talk will present an overview of the instrumentation, technique, and major science results from the MER-Pancam and MSL-Mastcam multispectral investigations. Plans for imaging science with the Mastcam-Z instrument on NASA’s next rover, which will launch in 2020, will also be discussed.

BIO: Dr. Melissa Rice is an Assistant Professor of Planetary Science at Western Washington University, where she has held a joint appointment in the Geology Department and the Physics & Astronomy Department since 2014. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Astronomy at Cornell University in 2012, and was a NASA Astrobiology Institute Postdoctoral fellow at Caltech from 2012-2014. Her research focuses on the sedimentology, stratigraphy and mineralogy of Mars. She is a collaborator on the active Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity missions, a Participating Scientist on the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission, and a Co-Investigator for the Mastcam-Z investigation in development for the Mars2020 rover mission.

Host: Dr. Michael Nolan
Kuiper Space Sciences: Room 312
Monday, Feb 22
2:00 pm
LPL Colloquium: Dr. Vishnu Reddy
Kuiper Space Sciences: Room 312
Monday, Feb 22
4:00 pm
TAP Colloquium: Dr. Robin Canup
Dr. Robin Canup
Associate Vice President - Research & Development
Southwest Research Institute

TAP Colloquia
Kuiper Space Sciences: Room 312
Monday, Feb 22
7:00 pm
College of Science Lecture Series: Earth Transformed: Dr. Kacey Ernst
Dr. Kacey Ernst
Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
University of Arizona

Climate Change and Human Health: Impacts and Pathways to Resilience
Climate change induced impacts on human health are myriad; they range from direct effects, such as heat related mortality during extreme heat events, to indirect effects on infectious disease transmission systems. Predicting the degree of impact climate change will have on a specific health outcome becomes more difficult as the pathways become more indirect. One such example is determining the potential risk of dengue emergence in the U.S.-Mexico border region where Ae. aegypti mosquito populations that transmit the virus are well-established. A suitable natural environment is necessary but not sufficient for virus transmission. Social, economic, and behavioral factors can all enhance or reduce risk. While these factors make predictions difficult, they also suggest a level of control that we as a society have to reduce our risk of negative health outcomes linked to a changing climate. Both top-down and bottom-up actions must be taken now to mitigate current and future health threats.

http://uascience.org/#lectures
Centennial Hall: Room
Tuesday, Feb 23
3:45 pm
LPL Graduate Student Colloquia: Hamish Hay
Hamish Hay
Graduate Student in the Department of Planetary Sciences
Kuiper Space Sciences: Room 312
Wednesday, Feb 24
7:00 pm
Space Drafts Public Talk Series: Dr. David O'Brien
Dr. David O'Brien
Planetary Science Institute

The Dawn Mission at Ceres
Borderlands Brewing Co.: Room
Friday, Feb 26
2:00 pm
LPL Colloquium: Dr. Lynn M. Carter
Dr. Lynn M. Carter
Research Space Scientist
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Candidate for faculty position, Earth Dynamics Observatory (comparative planetology)
Kuiper Space Sciences: Room 312
Monday, Feb 29
4:00 pm
TAP Colloquium: Dr. Jerry Sellwood
Dr. Jerry Sellwood
Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy
Rutgers University

TAP Colloquia
Kuiper Space Sciences: Room 312
Monday, Feb 29
7:00 pm
College of Science Lecture Series: Earth Transformed: Dr. Kimberly Ogden
Dr. Kimberly Ogden
Professor of Chemical and Environmental Engineering
University of Arizona

Carbon Sequestration: Can We Afford It?

Climate change as a result of carbon dioxide emissions from industry and power plants (especially coal-fired plants) is a world wide concern. Global strategies are required such as those proposed by the International Energy Association, which states that a minimum of 1/6th of CO2 future emissions must be captured and stored by 2050 to limit rises in average global temperature. Although there are many methods for capturing carbon, the primary barriers are testing them at a large scale, building an infrastructure to support them, and cost. These technologies include everything from injecting CO2 in the ground to recover oil to pumping it deep into the ocean to storing it in deep saline reservoirs to producing soil amendments. In addition to reviewing these technologies, this lecture will discuss methods for reducing carbon emissions by using more alternative energy as well as CO2 uptake by microalgae to produce food and fuel.

http://uascience.org/#lectures
Centennial Hall: Room