fall

OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Time Capsule

From September 2 to September 30, the OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission and The Planetary Society collected tweets and images as part of the Asteroid Time Capsule Campaign, which invited the public to tweet or post an image on Instagram (with hashtag #astero

Department News

OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Time Capsule

From September 2 to September 30, the OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission and The Planetary Society collected tweets and images as part of the Asteroid Time Capsule Campaign, which invited the public to tweet or post an image on Instagram (with hashtag #asteroidmission) to answer the question: Where are we now and where will we be in 2023 in Solar System exploration? Top tweets and images will be etched on the silicon wafer, which will be placed in the Sample Return Capsule (SRC). An identical wafer will be placed on the spacecraft. All entries will be archived in a virtual Time Capsule kept at the University of Arizona and scheduled to be opened in 2023. More information about the mission, ways to get involved, and the campaign is available at asteroidmission.org. This campaign served as a complement to Messages to Bennu, which collected participant names for a ride on the spacecraft.

 

Donors to LPL

In previous LPL newsletters, we have acknowledged some of the major donors to LPL, but we wanted to publicly acknowledge all of our generous donors who have helped make many things possible, ranging from the LPL field trips to the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory Conference, to The Art of Planetary Science.This list is for support in 2013 and 2014. If you should be on this list but are not, please let us know. And if you haven’t donated before, please consider it. Even small gifts can be of major help for specific projects.

Department News

Donors to LPL

In previous LPL newsletters, we have acknowledged some of the major donors to LPL, but we wanted to publicly acknowledge all of our generous donors who have helped make many things possible, ranging from the LPL field trips to the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory Conference, to The Art of Planetary Science.This list is for support in 2013 and 2014. If you should be on this list but are not, please let us know. And if you haven’t donated before, please consider it. Even small gifts can be of major help for specific projects.

Donors of funds for various purposes include:

David and Teresa Acklam, Kathi Baker, Bill Bottke, Dan Cavanagh, David Choi, Serina Diniega, Brad Hauert, Kelly Kolb, Simon Kregar, Brad Lloyd, Laura McGill, Caroline Pyevich, Jani Radebaugh, Tim and Jane Reckart, John Reidy, Andy Rivkin, Michelle Rouch, Tim Swindle, Matt Tiscareno, and Laurel Wilkening.

Donors of funds for Galileo Circle Scholarships for LPL students include:

Charles and Karen Autrey, Arch and Lura Brown, Herb and Sylvia Burton, Susan Butler, Don and Barbara Carrig, Philip and Jane Lacovara, Bob and Judy Logan, Jane McCollum (Marshall Foundation), Laura and Jim McGill, Bernie Merwald, and John Wahl and Mary Lou Forier.

Donors of other gifts (including meteorites, art work, and prizes for the art show) include:

Leif Abrell, Madeline Blank, Adam Block, Suzanne Bloomfield, Veronica Bray, Dick Brown, Eric Christensen, Phil Christensen, Lexi Coburn, Adrian Cornejo, Marilynn Flynn, Leontine Greenberg, Dolores Hill, James Keane, Simon Kregar, Carol Kucera, Sarah Kucerova, Tad Lamb, Margaret Landis, Dante Lauretta, Juan Lora, Renu Malhotra, Jamie Molaro, Marty Mongan, Janelle Montenegro, Amy Robertson, Tad Sallee, Henry Sarnoff, Xeni Schiller, Jess Vriesema, Ray Watts, Tom Zega, and Rob Zellem.

Thanks to all our donors!

Timothy D. Swindle, Ph.D.
Department Head and Laboratory Director

Shirley Curson, 1923-2014

Mrs. Shirley D. Curson-Weiss, friend and benefactor of LPL and the University of Arizona, died on April 21, 2014. Shirley (born Shandel Dauber) led a full, active life of travel and community involvement. She encouraged everyone, especially young people, to travel as part of the educational experience.

Department News

Shirley Curson, 1923-2014

Mrs. Shirley D. Curson-Weiss, friend and benefactor of LPL and the University of Arizona, died on April 21, 2014. Shirley (born Shandel Dauber) led a full, active life of travel and community involvement. She encouraged everyone, especially young people, to travel as part of the educational experience. To this end, she funded Shandel travel awards in several departments and colleges, including LPL, Journalism, and Fine Arts. Shirley generously supported other university groups as well and established the Shirley Curson Fund for Arizona Public Media. The 1774 Lepaute clock in the Kuiper Space Sciences building atrium is a gift of Mrs. Curson.

Gerry Neugebauer, 1932-2014

Dr. Gerry Neugebauer, the husband of LPL Affiliate Research Scientist Marcia Neugebauer, passed away on September 26, after a long illness. Gerry earned a Ph.D. in physics from Caltech in 1960, after which he served two years in the army, stationed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. When he returned to Caltech, he joined forces with Bob Leighton to build a simple infrared telescope and conduct the first all-sky survey in the infrared. He established one of the two leading programs that pioneered infrared astronomy.

Department News

Gerry Neugebauer, 1932-2014

Dr. Gerry Neugebauer, the husband of LPL Affiliate Research Scientist Marcia Neugebauer, passed away on September 26, after a long illness. Gerry earned a Ph.D. in physics from Caltech in 1960, after which he served two years in the army, stationed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. When he returned to Caltech, he joined forces with Bob Leighton to build a simple infrared telescope and conduct the first all-sky survey in the infrared. He established one of the two leading programs that pioneered infrared astronomy. Among many accomplishments, the program Neugebauer started revealed a number of extreme infrared-emitting stars (through the 2-micron sky survey), discovered the Center of the Milky Way, found the first protostar (the Becklin-Neugebauer Object), and led in the development of techniques for improved near-infrared measurements. He also led the science team for the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS). After retiring in 1998, Gerry and Marcia moved to Academy Village in Tucson, and Marcia became active in the Solar & Heliospheric research group at LPL, while Gerry was affiliated with Steward Observatory until his health began to fail. Gerry received the Space Science Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Herschel Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society in Britain, of which he was a member. He was also a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and
Sciences.

 

Recent PTYS/LPL Graduates

Ingrid Daubar

Department News

Recent PTYS/LPL Graduates

Ingrid Daubar

Tiffany Kataria

Juan Lora

Congratulations to Ingrid Daubar, Tiffany Kataria, and Juan Lora, LPL's most recent Ph.D. graduates!

On August 28, Ingrid Daubar defended her dissertation titled, "New Dated Craters on Mars and the Moon: Studies of the Freshest Craters in the Solar System." Ingrid's advisor was Professor Alfred McEwen. She will soon begin a NASA Postdoctoral Program appointment at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Tiffany Kataria defended her dissertation on August 22. Her advisor was Professor Adam Showman and her dissertation was titled, "Atmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters and Super Earths." Tiffany began a postdoctoral appointment as Research Fellow at the University of Exeter Department of Physics and Astronomy this fall, 2014.

Juan Lora, recipient of the 2014 Gerard P. Kuiper Memorial Award, defended on June 20. The dissertation is titlted, "Radiation and Dynamics in Titan's Atmosphere: Investigations of Titan's Present and Past Climate." Juan was advised by Dr. Joellen Russell. He is now a Postdoctoral Scholar with the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences at UCLA.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - fall