PTYS/LPL Faculty

Pierre Haenecour

Assistant Professor
Cosmochemistry, Planetary Astronomy
Ph.D., 2016 Washington University in St. Louis

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Kuiper 509D

Years with LPL: 2017 to present

 

Pierre will be joining the LPL faculty as an Assistant Professor in the Fall of 2019. He is currently a postdoctoral research associate working with Prof. Tom Zega and the Earths in Other Solar Systems (EOS) team (http://eos-nexus.org) on the characterization and coordinated in-situ study of primitive organic matter and circumstellar grains (also called presolar or stardust grains) in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles.

He grew up in Brussels (Belgium) and graduated with B.A. and M.S. degrees in Geology and Geochemistry from the Free University of Brussels. He then moved to St. Louis (Missouri) and obtained a M.A. degree and a Ph.D. in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Washington University in St. Louis. His background is in geochemistry and cosmochemistry, from terrestrial samples (e.g., Pb and Zn isotopes in Archean komatiitic lava flows) to primitive extraterrestrial samples (e.g., meteorites and micrometeorites), using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and a variety of in situ ion- and electron-microscopy techniques (e.g., secondary ion mass spectrometry, Auger and Raman spectroscopy, focused-ion-beam scanning-electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy). His research interests focus on the building blocks and early history of the Solar System history, and the origin of life. In particular, his doctoral research work focused on the identification and coordinated micro-analytical study of circumstellar (presolar) grains in primitive meteorites and fine-grained micrometeorites. 

Complete publications list available from: NASA ADS Author search: P. Haenecour

Refereed publications (NASA ADS): Calendar Years 2017 through June 2019

Haenecour, P., Howe, J. Y., Zega, T. J., Amari, S., Lodders, K., José, J., Kaji, K., Sunaoshi, T., Muto, A. Laboratory evidence for co-condensed oxygen- and carbon-rich meteoritic stardust from nova outbursts 2019NatAs.tmp..344H

Haenecour, P., Howe, J. Y., Zega, T. J., Amari, S., Lodders, K., José, J., Kaji, K., Sunaoshi, T., Muto, A. Laboratory evidence for co-condensed oxygen- and carbon-rich meteoritic stardust from nova outbursts 2019NatAs.tmp..310H

Haenecour, P., Howe, J. Y., Zega, T. J., Amari, S., Floss, C., Wallace, P., Lodders, K., Kaji, K., Sunaoshi, T., Muto, A. Low-Voltage Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Analysis of Presolar Graphite Spherules 2018MiMic..24S2110H

Howe, J. Y., Haenecour, P., Thompson, M. S., Dogel, S., Sunaoshi, T., Sagar, J., Hosseinkhannazer, H., Zega, T. J. Nanoscale Investigation of Thermal Alteration of Chondritic Meteorites via Simultaneous Secondary and Transmitted Electron Imaging during In Situ Heating up to 1000 oC 2018MiMic..24S2102H

Seifert, L., Haenecour, P., Zega, T., Floss, C., Howe, J. Multi-keV Analyses of a Presolar Mg-Silicate Grain via SEM/STEM 2018MiMic..24S2098S

Haenecour, P. Low-Voltage Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of 15N-Rich Organic Matter: Insight into the Origins of Fine-Grained Antarctic Micrometeorites 2018MiMic..24S2076H

Haenecour, P., Floss, C., Zega, T. J., Croat, T. K., Wang, A., Jolliff, B. L., Carpenter, P. Presolar silicates in the matrix and fine-grained rims around chondrules in primitive CO3.0 chondrites: Evidence for pre-accretionary aqueous alteration of the rims in the solar nebula 2018GeCoA.221..379H

Haenecour, P., Zega, T. J., Howe, J. Y., Wallace, P., Floss, C., Yada, T. Investigation of the Nature of Capping Layer Materials for FIB-SEM Preparation: Implications for the Study of Carbonaceous Material in Extraterrestrial Samples 2017MiMic..23S1820H

 

Haenecour et al. (2019). Laboratory evidence for co-condensed oxygen- and carbon-rich meteoritic stardust from nova outbursts. Nature Astronomy Letter (04/29/2019)

Forbes - 'Tiny Speck Of Actual Stardust' Found In Antarctic Meteorite 

The New York Post - ‘Alien’ grain of dust from ancient star found in Antarctica 

The Sun - ‘Alien’ grain of dust fired at Earth by ancient exploding star found buried in Antarctica – and could reveal how our Solar System was born 

 

Haenecour et al. (2013). First Laboratory observation of silica grains from core collapse supernovae. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 768: L17 (5pp) (05/01/2013)

The New Yorker An Exploding Star, a Grain of Sand, and an Origin Story 

Scientific American - A Star's Last Breath (video from Scientific American Space Lab Countdown)

The Huffington PostMeteorites, Supernova Linked After Rare Silica Grains Identified In Antarctic Space Rocks 

 

 

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PDF icon CV-Pierre Haenecour-April2019.pdf215.53 KBApril 29, 2019

Last updated on May 9, 2019