Earth

Could Algae Help Solve Climate Change?

Daniel Apai—a UArizona professor of Astronomy & Planetary Science—spends time studying the potential for life on other planets. In order to do so, he studies the unique factors that make life on Earth possible. His work led him to the natural processes of how coccolithophores in Earth’s oceans remove carbon from the atmosphere.

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Field Notes: University Researchers Talk About Their Time in Iceland

Christopher Hamilton and Solange Duhamel have been in Iceland since January studying volcanos, including an unexpected eruption that began in March. The researchers discuss the sights and tastes of the land of the midnight sun in this interview with Lo Que Pasa. Interviewer: Andy Ober Producer/Editor: Arlene Islas

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Unexpected Eruption Allows Real-time Look at Icelandic Volcano for LPL Researchers

What does it feel like to stand near a volcano? What does it sound like? What does it smell like? University of Arizona researchers Christopher Hamilton and Solange Duhamel describe how the unexpected eruption has provided them with a once-in-a-lifetime research opportunity. Arial Photography: Christopher Hamilton Interviewer: Andy Ober Producer/Editor: Arlene Islas

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The Search for Hazardous Asteroids from Mt. Lemmon

The mission of the Catalina Sky Survey is to contribute to the inventory of near-earth objects (NEOs), or more specifically, the potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) that pose an impact risk to Earth and it's inhabitants. The identification of the iridium anomaly at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (Alvarez et al., 1980), associated Chicxulub impact crater (Hildebrand et al., 1991) and the Permian- Triassic "great dying" possibly being associated with Australian Bedout crater (Becker et al., 2004) strongly suggest that impacts by minor planets play an important role in the evolution of life.

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Water: Beyond Earth

Life on Earth is comprised of water and organic molecules. In this talk, we explore the cosmic origins of these components, how they were delivered to the Earth, and how the exploration of asteroid Bennu by the OSIRIS-REx mission will help elucidate how Earth became habitable.

Jessica Barnes - Assistant Professor, Lunar & Planetary Laboratory

Pierre Haenecour - Assistant Professor, Lunar & Planetary Laboratory

Tracking the Origin of Water on Planet Earth

Bennu

Tracking the origin of water on planet Earth

Download Tracking the Origin of Water on Planet Earth (MP3, 12.01MB)

Life on Earth is comprised of water and organic molecules. University of Arizona planetary science professors Jessica Barnes and Pierre Haenecour discuss how some of these components could exist elsewhere in the solar system and how they contributed to the beginnings of life on our home planet.

Jessica Barnes and Pierre Haenecour spoke with Leslie Tolbert, Ph.D Regent's professor emerita at the University of Arizona. They are the first presenters in this year's UA College of Science public lecture series.

NPR

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UA Planetary Science 3D Models

Associate Professor of Practice Dr. Steve Kortenkamp is co-investigator for the University of Arizona's Project POEM, a National Science Foundation-funded project designed to introduce visually impaired middle and high school students to career possibilities in science, technology, engineering and math. Dr. K provides Project POEM students with 3-D models of real spacecraft and documented craters discovered in Arizona and on the surface of the moon and Mars. Many of the models, which are designed to let students experience craters through touch, are based on data and images collected by the UA's Mars HiRISE camera. The models are cast by Dr. K in his lab at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. Watch Dr. K describe how the tactile models are made and how they can help visually impaired students to explore planetary topography.

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