PTYS Undergraduate Courses

PTYS/ASTR 170A1

Planet Earth: Evolution of the Habitable World

This course develops a planetary perspective on the evolutionary processes that shaped Earth throughout history. We will examine why Earth is habitable, that is, why any kind of life can live on it, we will discuss the unique influences that biological processes and atmosphere/ocean systems have on each other, and we will review current notions of climate change, including evidence for the influence of human activities on it. This interdisciplinary treatment of Earth and its sister planets will encourage students to think about how science and engineering must be applied to today's challenges if humankind is to have a promising future on (and off) this planet. PTYS 170A1 is a Tier I Natural Science course in the University's general education curriculum. This course is co-convened (cross-listed) with ASTR 170A1.

PTYS/ASTR 170B2

The Universe and Humanity: Origin and Destiny

The Universe And Humanity: Origin And Destiny places Earth and humanity in a broad cosmic context. Topics range from the Big Bang cosmology to human consciousness with emphasis on the events and evolutionary processes that define the physical universe and our place in it. PTYS 170B2 is a Tier I Natural Science course in the University's general education curriculum. This course is co-convened (cross-listed) with ASTR 170B2.

PTYS 191/191H

Preceptorship/Honors Preceptorship

Scheduled as needed

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study. 1.00 - 5.00 units. Independent Study Required. Course may be repeated for a maximum of Unlimited unit(s) or Unlimited completion(s). Typically Offered. Fall, Spring, Summer 1 and 2.

LASC 195A

Water and Life on Mars

Students will access planetary mission data to study the present and past Mars environment in regard to the activity of water and related possibilities that living organisms are or were extant on that planet. The student research will involve interdisciplinary work in astrobiology, hydrology, and planetary geology.

PTYS 195A

First Year Colloquium

Freshmen and other first year students are encouraged to enroll in one-unit First Year Colloquia that allow for in-depth exploration of a science topic. Colloquia feature lively discussion and class participation. Topics vary by semester (e.g., "The Changing Sun and its Influence on Earth: Does the Sun's natural variability affect climate on Earth?" and "Why do we have a space program?"). For further information, contact the Department of Planetary Sciences.

PTYS 199/199H

Independent Study/Honors Independent Study

Scheduled as needed

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. 1.00 - 3.00 units.  Independent Study Required. Course may be repeated for a maximum of Unlimited unit(s) or Unlimited completion(s). Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer 1 and 2 .

PTYS/ASTR 206

Exploring Our Solar System

Our Solar System is filled with an incredible diversity of objects. These include the sun and planets, of course, but also many hundreds of moons—some with exotic oceans, erupting volcanoes, or dynamic atmospheres. Billions of asteroids and comets inhabit the space between and beyond the planets. Each body is unique, and has followed its own evolutionary history. This class will explore our current understanding of the Solar System and emphasize similarities that unite the different bodies as well as the differences between them. We will develop an understanding of physical processes that occur on these bodies, including tectonics, impact cratering, volcanism, and processes operating in their interiors, oceans, and atmospheres. We will also discuss planets around nearby stars and the potential for life beyond Earth. Throughout the class, we will highlight the leading role that the University of Arizona has played in exploring our Solar System.

Course Objectives: Students who engage with this course will develop a broad understanding of many fundamental concepts in planetary science and gain an appreciation for the discoveries and reasoning that leads to this understanding. They will learn to collect their own data as well as gather relevant supporting information from a variety of outside sources. Throughout the semester students will be demonstrating their grasp of course material by composing written assignments at a level their peers outside of the class will understand (a.k.a., Students on the Street, or SOS). During the term project students will be assisted in working with telescopes to obtain astronomical images using their own smart phone cameras. Students will learn during in-class workshops how to use their own images to then construct a time-lapse animation. Expected Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to (1) access and use information and data from a variety of sources, including their own activities, (2) critically evaluate this information and data for reliability in supporting fundamental concepts, (3) effectively communicate an understanding of these concepts to their SOS peers by synthesizing the information and data they have gathered, (4) demonstrate practical skills with a variety of software, including Word, Excel, Keynote, PowerPoint, and image/video editing apps.

PTYS 206 is cross-listed with ASTR 206. Course requisites: Two courses from Tier One, Natural Sciences.

PTYS 212

The Science and Politics of Global Warming

The course is devoted to the concepts and principles required for understanding the Greenhouse Effect. It will then cover the effects of global warming on our climate both for past warming and cooling episodes (ice ages) and future predicted effects on our lives and the environment. The last third will deal with the present and future political and commercial issues of global warming. A research paper and a class presentation on a selected topic of global warming will be required. PTYS 212/212H is a Tier II Natural Science course in the University's general education curriculum.

PTYS/ASTR/GEOS 214

Astrobiology: A Planetary Perspective

We will explore questions about the origin, evolution, and future of life on Earth and the possibility of life arising independently elsewhere in the Universe. We will examine what it means for a planet to be habitable, both in terms of basic necessities for living organisms to function and environmental limits to their ability to survive. Finally, we will review different approaches for searching for life within the Solar System and beyond using direct and remote sensing techniques. PTYS 214 is a Tier II Natural Science course in the University general education curriculum. PTYS 214 is cross-listed with ASTR 214 and GEOS 214. Course is equivalent to ASTR 202 (students may not receive credit for both courses).

PTYS 297A

Teaching Teams Professional Development Workshop

Professional development for undergraduates of all disciplines in areas of peer instruction and mentoring, leadership, public speaking, group dynamics, and interview skills; also assists students with preceptorships.

PTYS 299/299H

Independent Study/Honors Independent Study

Scheduled as needed

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Units: 1-3. Independent Study Required. Typically offered: Fall and Spring.

PTYS 342

Life on Mars: Fact and Fiction

Life on Mars is likely to be a scientific "hot topic" for the rest of your life. After this class, you should have a good understanding of what planetary scientists think about the chances of life on Mars, why they think that, and how current and future spacecraft missions plan to address that. In addition, since life on Mars has been the subject of some classic science fiction for more than 100 years, with no signs of letting up, you should understand how that science fiction relates to science. My real goal is that as the current debate resolves itself, and as spacecraft explore Mars during the next few decades, you'll understand what's going on and which claims are important, and that as you read or watch science fiction dealing with Mars, you'll appreciate how it relates to past and present science and sci-fi. PTYS 342 may not be applied toward the PTYS undergraduate minor.

PTYS 392

Directed Research

Scheduled as needed

Individual or small group research under the guidance of faculty. Units: 1.00 - 6.00. Regular Grades. Independent Study Required. Honors Contract Course.

PTYS 393

Teaching Teams Internship

Internship for students who have completed PTYS 297A (formerly LASC 297A), with at least one semester as a preceptor of a university-level course) to continue their reaching team education. Course covers elements of learning environments, communication skills, providing feedback, performance evaluation, and cooperative learning strategies.

PTYS 395B

Special Topics in Planetary Science

This one-unit colloquium course features discussion on topics in Planetary Science. Topic and instructor vary by term. Units: 1.00. Grading basis: Student Option ABCDE/PF. Pass/Fail Option Available to Qualified Students Regular or Alternative Grades: ABCDE grading. Typically offered: Fall and Spring

PTYS 397A

Professional Development in a Digital Age

Professional development in areas that are affected by transition to digital formats. Students will learn about elevator pitches, communication, utilizing professional technologies, resumes and curriculum vitaes, online resumes and portfolios, professionalism within social media, searching for jobs online, and interviewing.

PTYS 399/399H

Independent Study

Scheduled as needed

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Units: 1.00 - 5.00.  Independent Study Required. Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer 1 and 2.

PTYS/ASTR/GEOS/PHYS 403

Physics of the Solar System

Survey of planetary physics, planetary motions, planetary interiors, geophysics, planetary atmospheres, asteroids, comets, origin of the solar system. Prerequisites: PHYS 142 or 251. PTYS 403 is a required course for the PTYS Minor. Equivalen to ASTR/GEOS/PHYS 403.

PTYS 407

Chemistry of the Solar System

Abundance, origin, distribution, and chemical behavior of the chemical elements in the Solar System. Emphasis on applications of chemical equilibrium, photochemistry, and mineral phase equilibrium theory. Prerequisites: CHEM 152, MATH 129, and PHYS 132 or their equivalents. PTYS 407 is required for the PTYS Minor. PTYS 407 is equivalent to CHEM 407 (not cross-listed).

PTYS 411

Geology and Geophysics of the Solar System

Geologic processes and landforms on satellites and the terrestrial planets, their modification under various planetary environments, and methods of analysis. PTYS 411 is equivalent to GEOS 411 and HWRS 411 (cross-listed). PTYS 411 is required for the PTYS Minor.

PTYS 413

Planetary Materials

This course discusses chemical thermodynamics and applies it to the origins and history of primitive planetary materials. The types of planetary materials will be discussed together with an overview of the chemical setting of their origins. We will discuss thermodynamic formalism, the various chemical pathways through which planetary materials are believed to have formed, the characterization and numerical methods we use to quantify such origins, and we will consider several case studies. May be co-convened with PTYS 513.

PTYS 416

Asteroids, Comets and Kuiper Belt Objects

This is an introduction to the "minor planets," the asteroids, comets and Kuiper Belt objects. The focus will be on origin and evolution (including current evolution), as well as techniques of study. It will include an evening at the telescope of an asteroid search program. Graduate-level requirement includes some original work or calculations in the paper/project submitted and to research one of the primary topics and lead the class discussion of it. PTYS 416 may be co-convened with PTYS 516.
 

ASTR 418

Instrumentation and Statistics

Radiant energy; signals and noise; detectors and techniques for imaging, photometry, polarimetry and spectroscopy. Examples from stellar and planetary astronomy in the x-ray, optical, infrared and radio. ASTR is home department. May be convened with: ASTR/PTYS 518.

GEOS 419

Physics of the Earth

Fundamentals of the physics of the solid earth, including thermodynamics, rheology, geomagnetism, gravity, and planet tectonics. Prerequisite(s): MATH 254. GEOS is home department. May be convened with: PTYS/GEOS 519.

GEOS 430

The Chemical Evolution of Earth

Chemical differentiation and evolution of Earth's mantle and crust according to major-element, trace-element and isotopic characteristics of neodymium, hafnium, strontium, lead and other isotopes. Prerequisite(s): GEOS 356 or equivalent undergraduate petrology. GEOS is home department.

ATMO 441A

Dynamic Meteorology

Thermodynamics and its application to planetary atmospheres, hydrostatics, fundamental concepts and laws of dynamic meteorology. Prerequisite: PHYS 426 or consent of instructor. ATMO is home department.

ATMO 441B

Dynamic Meteorology

Thermodynamics and its application to planetary atmospheres, hydrostatics, fundamental concepts and laws of dynamic meteorology. Prerequisite(s): ATMO 300A, ATMO 300B, PHYS 426 or consent of instructor. ATMO is home department. Usually offered: Spring.

PTYS 442

Mars

In-depth class about the planet Mars, including origin and evolution, geophysics, geology, atmospheric science, climate change, the search for life, and the history and future of Mars exploration. There will be guest lectures from professors and research scientists with expertise about aspects of Mars. There will be lots of discussion of recent results and scientific controversies about Mars. Graduate-level requirements include the completion of a research project that will be presented in class as well as a report. The research project could be analysis of Mars datasets, a laboratory experiment, or new theoretical modeling. Regular grades are awarded for this course: A B C D E. Prerequisite(s): PTYS 411, Geology of the Solar System is strongly recommended but not required. Equivalent to/crosslisted: ASTR 442, GEOS 442. May be convened with: PTYS 542.

PTYS/ASTR/GEOS 442

Mars

In-depth class about the planet Mars, including origin and evolution, geophysics, geology, atmospheric science, climate change, the search for life, and the history and future of Mars exploration. There will be guest lectures from professors and research scientists with expertise about aspects of Mars. There will be lots of discussion of recent results and scientific controversies about Mars. Graduate-level requirements include the completion of a research project that will be presented in class as well as a report. The research project could be analysis of Mars datasets, a laboratory experiment, or new theoretical modeling. Regular grades are awarded for this course: A B C D E. Prerequisite(s): PTYS 411, Geology of the Solar System is strongly recommended but not required. Equivalent to/crosslisted: ASTR 442, GEOS 442. May be convened with: PTYS 542.

PTYS 450

Origin of the Solar System and Other Planetary Systems

This course will review the physical processes related to the formation and evolution of the protosolar nebula and of protoplanetary disks. In doing that, we will discuss the main stages of planet formation and how different disk conditions impact planetary architectures and planet properties. We will confront the theories of disk evolution and planet formation with observations of circumstellar disks, exoplanets, and the planets and minor bodies in our Solar System. This course may be co-convened with PTYS/ASTR 550.

ASTR 455

Teaching College-Level Astronomy & Planetary Science

Students will discuss their current or recent experiences as a student. They will also learn how to create productive learning environments by reviewing research on the nature of teaching and learning; setting course goals and objectives; using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, and ranking tasks; and observing other instructors. Students will conduct a collaborative research project of their choosing related to astronomy and space science. The course will culminate with students presenting mock lectures using these techniques. Prerequisite(s): Student must be Astronomy or Planetary Science undergraduate or graduate major. Consent of instructor. Typical structure: 1 hour lecture. May be repeated: for credit 3 times (maximum 4 enrollments). ASTR is home department. May be convened with: ASTR/PTYS 555. Usually offered: Spring.

ASTR 475

Planetary Astrobiology

This course will explore the processes related to planet formation, the properties of planets and the planetary conditions required for the emergence of life. We will study the formation of our Solar System and exoplanetary systems, the distribution and properties of exoplanets, and the potential habitability of other planets/moons in our system or extrasolar systems. The course will also review science cases and possible future astrobiology studies, both in site and via remote sensing, of astrobiologically relevant environments. Toward the end of the semester a few guest lectures will highlight particularly exciting and timely topics. This course may be co-convened with ASTR/PTYS 575.

PTYS 492

Directed Research

Scheduled as needed

Individual or small group research under the guidance of faculty. Units: 1.00 - 6.00. Regular Grades. Independent Study Required. Typically Offered: Fall and Spring. Honors Contract Course.

PTYS 493

Advanced Teaching Teams Internship

This advanced internship is for students who have completed PTYS 393. Course covers elements of learning environments, communication skills, providing feedback, performance evaluation, and cooperative learning strategies; it requires students to peer lead workshop sections within the Teaching Teams Program alongside a faculty/staff mentor.

PTYS 495B

Special Topics in Planetary Science

Course will emphasize emerging and current topical research in Planetary Science; course will be offered as needed or required.  Sample course topics might include an active spacecraft mission, an emerging research area, or new discoveries.  Course may be co-convened with PTYS 595B. Graduate-level requirements may include an additional project for graduate credit and extra questions on exams, depending on the course/topic taught. Course may be repeated for credit 3x (or up to 9 units).

PTYS 498

Senior Capstone

Scheduled as needed

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required. Unites: 1.00-3.00. Independent Study Required. Typically Offered: Fall and Spring. Regular or Alternative Grades: ABCDE or SPCDE

PTYS 498H

Senior Thesis

Scheduled as needed

An honors thesis is required of all students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis. Maximum 3 enrollments. Units: 3.00. Regular Grades. Independent Study Required. Typically Offered: Fall and Spring. Student must be active in the Honors College.

PTYS 499/499H

Independent Study

Scheduled as needed

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Units. 1.00 - 5.00.  Independent Study Required. Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer 1 and 2.