Spring 2021 Graduate Courses

Physics of the Solar System (3)

Survey of planetary physics, planetary motions, planetary interiors, geophysics, planetary atmospheres, asteroids, comets, origin of the solar system. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a selected topic and an oral class presentation. This course does not count toward the major requirements in Planetary Sciences. Equivalent to: ASTR 503, GEOS 503, and PHYS 503 (and cross-listed); may be co-convened with PTYS 403. PTYS is home department.

(001) Yelle | D2L

Core Course

Chemistry of the Solar System (3)

PTYS Graduate Core Course. Provides an overview of the gas and ice chemistry in planetary environments including molecular structure, spectroscopy, kinetics. The course describes how these physical processes are manifest in the diverse solar system environments. The instructional level is aimed at beginning graduate students with an adequate background comparable to that obtained from advance undergraduate courses in physics and chemistry. Knowledge of vector calculus and elementary differential equations is assumed. Successful students will be able to understand current research in planetary chemistry and will be well prepared for more detailed studies.
Sample course syllabus, Pascucci (PDF)

 

(001) Pascucci | D2L | Syllabus

Core Course

Atmospheres and Remote Sensing (3)

PTYS Graduate Core Course. Structure, composition, and evolution of atmospheres; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; radiative transfer and spectral line formatting.
Sample course syllabus, Griffith (PDF)
Sample course syllabus, Yelle (PDF)

(001) Griffith | D2L | Syllabus

Meteorites (3)

Classification; chemical, mineralogical and isotopic composition; cosmic abundances; ages; interaction with solar and cosmic radiation; relation to comets and asteroids. Prerequisite(s): PTYS 510. Identical to: GEOS 520. Usually offered: Spring.

(001) Barnes | D2L

Nanoscale Analysis of Materials Using Transmission Electron Microscopy (3)

This course discusses the theory and practice of transmission electron microscopy as applied crystalline solids. Among the topics to be covered include electron scattering and diffraction, image formation, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Weekly lectures will be accompanied by several laboratory practical sessions. Emphasis will be placed on quantitative analysis of material structure and composition as well as the identification of unknown materials. Equivalent to: MSE 526; PTYS is home department.

Dynamic Metereology (3)

Thermodynamics and its application to planetary atmospheres, hydrostatics, fundamental concepts and laws of dynamic meteorology. Graduate-level requirements include a more quantitative and thorough understanding of the subject matter. ATMO is home department.

(001) Atallah

Mars (3)

In-depth class about the planet Mars, including origin and evolution, geophysics, geology, atmospheric science, climate change, the search for life, and the history and future of Mars exploration. There will be guest lectures from professors and research scientists with expertise about aspects of Mars. There will be lots of discussion of recent results and scientific controversies about Mars. Graduate-level requirements include the completion of a research project that will be presented in class as well as a report. The research project could be analysis of Mars datasets, a laboratory experiment, or new theoretical modeling. Regular grades are awarded for this course: A B C D E. Prerequisite(s): PTYS 411, Geology of the Solar System is strongly recommended but not required. Identical to: ASTR 542, GEOS 542. May be convened with: PTYS 442.

Stars and Planets (3)

This course will explore the physical principles that govern the structure and evolution of stars and planets. Topics covered will include stellar structure, energy generation and transport, and equations of state. Applying physical models and computational methods, fundamental properties of stars and planets will be derived, and compared with observational constraints. Identical to: ASTR 545; ASTR is home department. Usually offered: Fall.

(001) Psaltis

Remote Sensing of Planetary Surfaces (4)

This graduate course will focus on the use of remote sensing in the study of rocky and icy planetary surfaces.It is not a science course, but rather intended to provide technical knowledge of how instruments work and practical techniques to deal with their datasets. In this course, we will cover how different types of remote-sensing instruments work in theory and practice along with case studies (student-led) of specific planetary science instruments.  We will discuss what datasets are generated by these instruments, their limitations and where they can be located. Lab sessions will provide experience in how these data are processed, visualized and intercompared. The class consists of two lectures and a 2.5-hour lab session each week. Cross-listed with GEOS, equivalent to GEOS 551.

(001) Byrne | D2L | Syllabus

(01A) Byrne | D2L | Syllabus

Boundary Layer Meteorology & Surface Processes (3)

Designed for students in the atmospheric sciences, hydrology and related fields. It provides a framework for understanding the basic physical processes that govern mass and heat transfer in the atmospheric boundary layer and the vegetated land surface. In addition to the theoretical part of the course, there is a strong focus on modeling and students will be required to program numerical codes to represent these physical processes. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 unit(s) or 2 completion(s). Also offered as: ATMO 579, ENVS 579, HWRS 579, WSM 579. ATMO is home department.

(001) Ozel

Astrochemistry (3)

This astrochemistry course is the study of gas phase and solid state chemical processes that occur in the universe, including those leading to pre-biotic compounds. Topics include chemical processes in dying stars, circumstellar gas, planetary nebulae, diffuse clouds, star-forming regions and proto-planetary discs, as well as planets, satellites, comets and asteroids. Observational methods and theoretical concepts will be discussed. Graduate-level requirements include a project and an oral exam. Identical to ASTR 588A; may be convened with ASTR 488A. ASTR is home department.

(001) Lucy Ziurys

Special Topics in Planetary Science (1-4)

Course will emphasize emerging and current topical research in Planetary Science; course will be offered as needed or required.  Sample course topics might include an active spacecraft mission, an emerging research area, or new discoveries.  Course may be co-convened with PTYS 495B. Graduate-level requirements may include an additional project for graduate credit and extra questions on exams, depending on the course/topic taught. Course may be repeated for credit 4x (or up to 12 units). Regular grades assigned (ABC).

(001) Asphaug | Syllabus

Spring 2021, PTYS 595B (001), Asphaug, PLANET-FORMING COLLISIONS, 3 units

(002) Malhotra | D2L | Syllabus

Spring 2021, PTYS 595B (002), Malhotra, ADVANCED DYNAMICS, 3 units

(003) Lauretta | D2L | Syllabus

Spring 2021, PTYS 595B (003), Lauretta, 3 units. Spacecraft Mission Design and Implementation.

Planetary Surface Processes Seminar (1)

This seminar course will focus on discussion of planetary surfaces and their evolution, including geology of rocky planets and moons, icy surfaces and moons, regolith development, surface-atmosphere interactions, sub-surface structure and interiors, and climate change. The course will involve the exchange of scholarly information in a small group setting, including presentations and discussions of student research, reviews of recent science results and discussion of proposal ideas. Students will be expected to lead 1 to 2 presentations and participate in group discussions. This course is intended for graduate students; senior undergraduates may be able to enroll with permission of the instructor. Alternative Grading S, P, F; may be repeated for 10 completions/units.

(001) Carter | D2L | Syllabus

Methods in Computational Astrophysics (3)

The course is a "hands-on" introduction to computer use for research by scientists in astrophysics and related areas. The course begins with a survey of and introduction to tools available on Linux systems, web-based tools, and open-source software widely used in astrophysics. Standard methods for integration, iteration, differential and difference equations, and Monte Carlo simulations, are discussed, in one to four dimensions. Historically important methods of radiative transfer, reaction networks, and hydrodynamics are presented, and contrasted with presently-used methods. Parallel programming is introduced, and discussed in terms of new and future computer systems. Special topics are added to reflect new developments. The course is task-oriented, with individual and team work projects, and class participation determining grades. Most of the work is done on the student's own personal computer (Linux or Mac operating systems are preferred). Identical to ASTR/PHYS 596B. ASTR is home department. Equivalent to ASTR 596B and PHYS 596B; ASTR is home department. Typically Offered Spring. Regular or Alternative Grades: ABCDE or SPF.

(001) Pinto