Graduate Student News

2015 Carson Fellowship to Nathanial Hendler

Nathanial Hendler is the recipient of the 2015 Carson Fellowship Award, which provides one academic year of support, including salary, tuition and a small supply stipend. Nathanial is beginning his first year of graduate studies at LPL.

fall 2015 Graduate Student News

2015 Carson Fellowship to Nathanial Hendler

Nathanial Hendler is the recipient of the 2015 Carson Fellowship Award, which provides one academic year of support, including salary, tuition and a small supply stipend. Nathanial is beginning his first year of graduate studies at LPL.

Nathanial grew up in Colorado and had an early fascination with insects. After high school, he spent over ten years as a computer programmer, which included working at an early internet service provider, designing databases for several internet-bubble startups, and working at Sony creating video games. Nathanial took a break from the software industry with a variety of jobs which included a glass-blowing apprenticeship and work as a baggage handler at the Tucson International Airport. A stint as a cargo worker at the South Pole led to a renewed interest in science as a career. Nathanial enrolled at Pima Community College (Tucson) and in 2015, earned his Bachelor's degree in Geosciences (with minors in Planetary Sciences and Mathematics) from the University of Arizona. His undergraduate research projects included protoplanetary disk dispersal with Dr. Ilaria Pascucci; the fabrication and spectroscopy of ice dwarf analogue ices with Dr. Will Grundy (Lowell Observatory) and Dr. Stephen Tegler (Professor, Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University); NASA Space Grant; paleoseismology in Southern California with Dr. William Bull (Professor Emeritus, UA Geosciences); and Salt River Canyon detrital zircon dating with Dr. George Gehrels (Professor, UA Geosciences)

Nathanial is currently working with Dr. Pascucci to investigate the disk mass stellar mass relation using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. He is interested in the evolution of the Solar System, planet formation, and the cosmochemistry of protoplanetary disks.

When he's not focused on his academic and research pursuits, Nathanial is busy entertaining his nine-month old daughter. Before starting graduate school and becoming a father, Nathanial's extracurricular hobbies and interests included baking bread and restoring radios and TVs. He admits to having authored the only Macintosh System 6/7 Twitter client and part of his personal insect collection is on display at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.


The Lt. Col. Kenneth Rondo Carson and Virginia Bryan Carson Graduate Fellowship is an endowment established by the estate of Virginia B. Carson, honoring her husband, a former member of the "Flying Tigers," a former member of the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff Strategic Air Command, retired master navigator and enthusiast of space exploration. Colonel Carson greatly admired the professionalism and accomplishments of NASA's space program. The Carson Fellowship is awarded to students pursuing degrees in the Department of Planetary Sciences, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, selected on the basis of academic achievement and the promise of further scholarly endeavor.

2015 NESSF Awards

Kudos to LPL graduate students with new or continuing NESSF (NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship) Awards:

New for 2015

fall 2015 Graduate Student News

2015 NESSF Awards

Kudos to LPL graduate students with new or continuing NESSF (NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship) Awards:

New for 2015

  • Hamish Hay, "Tidal Dissipation in the Subsurface Oceans of the Icy Satellites" (advisor: Isamu Matsuyama)
  • Sarah Peacock, "Understanding the Early Evolution of M dwarf Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation" (advisor: Travis Barman)

Renewed for 2015

  • Patricio Becerra, "Wavelet Analysis of Martian Polar Stratigraphy from HiRISE Topography" (advisor: Shane Byrne)
  • James Keane, "Stability of Asteroidal Regolith During Planetary Close Approaches" (advisor: Isamu Matsuyama)
  • Tad Komacek, "Magnetic effects in hot Jupiters" (advisor: Adam Showman)
  • Cecilia Leung, "Mesoscale meteorological modeling of the martian hydrological cycle" (advisor: Alfred McEwen)
  • Kelly Miller, "Tracing sulfur in the early Solar System with the Rumuruti chondrites" (advisor: Dante Lauretta)
  • Sarah Morrison, "Multiple Planet-Debris Disk Interactions: Probing Planetary System Evolution" (advisor: Kaitlin Kratter)
  • Xianyu TanAtmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs" (advisor: Adam Showman )
  • Michelle ThompsonUnderstanding space weathering of asteroids and the lunar surface: Analysis of experimental analogs and samples from the Hayabusa and Apollo missions"  (advisor: Tom Zega)

Welcome, Jonathan Dykhuis!

Congratulations to Melissa and Nathan Dykhuis, who welcomed a new son, Jonathan Joseph, born April 17, 9.0 lbs and 21 inches. Melissa writes, "He's got the sleep schedule of an astronomer already, and has a head start learning the names of the planets from his excited older brother, Matthew."

spring 2015 Graduate Student News

Welcome, Jonathan Dykhuis!

Congratulations to Melissa and Nathan Dykhuis, who welcomed a new son, Jonathan Joseph, born April 17, 9.0 lbs and 21 inches. Melissa writes, "He's got the sleep schedule of an astronomer already, and has a head start learning the names of the planets from his excited older brother, Matthew."

 

 

 

Jamie Molaro Wins College of Science Outstanding Service Award

LPL’s Jamie Molaro won the award for Outstanding Service and Outreach at the  8th Annual College of Science Graduate Student Awards.

spring 2015 Graduate Student News

Jamie Molaro Wins College of Science Outstanding Service Award

LPL’s Jamie Molaro won the award for Outstanding Service and Outreach at the  8th Annual College of Science Graduate Student Awards. The award, sponsored by the UA College of Science and the Associate Graduate Council, recognizes attention to broader impacts and involvement in activities outside of academic responsibilities that benefit the department, university and the larger community (e.g., representing graduate student interests on councils or committees, organizing graduate student events, assisting departmental recruitment, participating in K-12 outreach, etc.). Jamie more than met these criteria through her efforts in developing and organizing The Art of Planetary Science (TAPS) in 2013 and for leading the exhibit in its second, even more successful incarnation in 2014.

TAPS has become a community event, thanks to Jamie's efforts at networking and building partnerships with local artists, museums, and with local business. For 2014, Jamie crafted a significant new partnership with the International Association of Astronomical Artists (IAAA), dramatically increased the participation of the IAAA in this year’s art show, and also collaborated extensively with the local Tucson chapter of the IAAA in ensuring cross-advertisement between TAPS and the IAAA’s own local art show. Jamie also pursued new partnerships with the College of Science, which culminated in a private, catered showing for the Galileo Circle the night prior to the grand opening. Jamie strengthened existing partnerships that she had developed in 2013, most notably with the Tucson Museum of Art’s “Art on Tap” — an art and craft beer festival. Through collaboration with Tucson Museum of Art, Jamie was able to have the winners of TAPS and several selected works displayed while providing free access to the show for artists. Lastly, Jamie also coordinated advertisement for the art show, including talking with reporters for the Arizona Daily Star, UA News (video: http://tinyurl.com/artofplanetaryscience), The Daily Wildcat, and NPR. Jamie has also presented The Art of Planetary Science to the scientific community, with posters and talks at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) and American Astronomical Society Division for Planetary Science (DPS) conference. These presentations serve to inform fellow scientists and science educators on how we created and executed such a successful art show—with the aim of inspiring similar programs at other institutions and attracting scientists to submit artwork for future shows. As this weren't enough, Jamie also coordinated with the organizers of the October 2014 DPS meeting (held in Tucson) to allow a miniature showing of the artwork at the conference.

Thanks to Jamie Molaro, the 2014 Art of Planetary Science was a resounding success, with more than 200 pieces of artwork from 90 artists and scientists. The show spanned three floors of the Kuiper Space Sciences building, which was transformed into an art gallery. Over the three nights of the art show (plus the special Galileo Circle event), TAPS drew a crowd of over 800 people—over double what we saw in the first show in 2013. The artists sold several dozen pieces of artwork, making over $2,000 for the local Tucson art community, along with several hundred dollars in donation to the College of Science and to LPL.

Jamie's award was announced at a reception held on April 7. This is the fourth consecutive year that an LPL graduate student has won one of the three college-wide awards. Given that our graduate students are competing against the best students from 11 other departments, having a winner four years in a row speaks to the excellence of our graduate students.

Congratulations, Jamie!

2015 Curson Travel Award

Ali Bramson and Kelly Miller have been announced as recipients of funds from the 2015 Curson Travel Scholarship.

spring 2015 Graduate Student News

2015 Curson Travel Award

Ali Bramson and Kelly Miller have been announced as recipients of funds from the 2015 Curson Travel Scholarship.

Ali is a fourth-year graduate student working with Associate Professor Shane Byrne. She plans to use the funds to support participation in a two-week summer field campaign in Iceland, followed by the fall 2015 HiRISE camera team meeting to be held in Lake Myvatn, Iceland. The field work is part of a Terrestrial Analogs for Planetary Surfaces campaign intended to fulfill science objectives of Assistant Professor Christopher Hamilton's NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics grant.

Kellly Miller is a fifth-year graduate student advised by Professor Dante Lauretta. Her Curson award will help to fund travel to the Solar System Origins Gordon Research Conference (GRC), to be held June 28 to July 3, at Mount Holyoke College. The topic of the GRC, which is intended as a scientific conference with limited participation, is "The Physics and Chemistry of Building Planets: Recent Advances and Future Prospects." Kelly will present a poster and work with colleagues in the planetary formation community.

We'll report on the summer travel and research in the LPL Fall Newsletter!

James Keane Named Recipient of 2015 Gerard P. Kuiper Award

Congratulations to James Tuttle Keane, recipient of the 2015 Gerard P. Kuiper Memorial Award.

spring 2015 Graduate Student News

James Keane Named Recipient of 2015 Gerard P. Kuiper Award

Congratulations to James Tuttle Keane, recipient of the 2015 Gerard P. Kuiper Memorial Award.

James Keane is a fourth-year graduate student advised by Assistant Professor Isamu Matsuyama. He graduated from the University of Maryland (College Park) in 2011 with B.Sc. degrees in Astronomy (with High Honors) and Geology (with Honors). Keane's research interests include the formation and evolution of solar system planets, planetary satellites, and small bodies, with an emphasis on the interactions between rotational/orbital dynamics and geologic processes of terrestrial and icy bodies.

Keane was awarded a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship (NESSF) for 2013-2016, for research on "Stability of Asteroid Regolith during Planetary Close Approaches." He is the recipient of several other awards, including a 2014 Outstanding Student Paper Award from the American Geophysical Union (fall meeting) for "The Contribution of Impact Basins and Mascons to the Lunar Figure: Evidence for Lunar True Polar Wander, and a Past Low-Eccentricity, Synchronous Lunar Orbit." Keane was also awarded a 2014 Galileo Circle Scholarship from the University of Arizona's College of Science.

In 2014, Keane was first author on two journal articles:

  • Keane, J. T., Matsuyama, I. (2014). Evidence for lunar true polar wander and a past low-eccentricity synchronous lunar orbit. Geophysical Research Letters 41:6610
  • Keane, J. T., Pascucci, I., Espaillat, C., Woitke, P., Andrews, S., Kamp, I., Thi, W. F., Meeus, G., Dent, W. R. F. (2014). Evidence for Disk Flattening or Gas Depletion in Transitional Disks. Astrophysical Journal 787:152.

In addition to his studies and research, Keane has been actively involved with planetary science outreach in Tucson and at LPL, including serving as a volunteer for OSIRIS-REx, Tucson Festival of Books, and LPL special events. He volunteers, too, at the Pima Air and Space Museum; works as a counselor for UA Astronomy Camp; and serves as a writer and artist for 321 Science! Keane is also one of two co-organizers responsible for developing and organizing The Art of Planetary Science at LPL.

Keane plans to defend his dissertation in 2016.


The citation for the Kuiper Award reads: "This award is presented to students of the planetary sciences who best exemplify, through the high quality of their researches and the excellence of their scholastic achievements, the goals and standards established and maintained by Gerard P. Kuiper, founder of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory and the Department of Planetary Sciences at the University of Arizona."

 

2015 Galileo Circle Scholarships

Congratulations to LPL's 2015 Galileo Circle Scholarship recipients: Melissa Dykhuis, Youngmin JeongAhn, Tad Komacek, Margaret Landis, Xianyu Tan, Michelle Thompson, and Rob Zellem. Galileo Circle Scholarships are awarded to the University of Arizona's finest science students and represent the tremendous breadth of research interests in the College of Science.

spring 2015 Graduate Student News

2015 Galileo Circle Scholarships

Congratulations to LPL's 2015 Galileo Circle Scholarship recipients: Melissa Dykhuis, Youngmin JeongAhn, Tad Komacek, Margaret Landis, Xianyu Tan, Michelle Thompson, and Rob Zellem. Galileo Circle Scholarships are awarded to the University of Arizona's finest science students and represent the tremendous breadth of research interests in the College of Science.

Galileo Circle Scholars receive $1,000 each; these awards are supported through the generous donations of Galileo Circle members. The Galileo Scholars were honored at an early evening reception held on April 9, 2015.

Congratulations to all our 2015 Galileo Scholars!

Melissa Dykhuis
(Greenberg)

Youngmin JeongAhn
(Malhotra)

Tad Komacek
(Showman)

 

Margaret Landis
(Byrne)

 

Xianyu Tan
(Showman)

Michelle Thompson
(Zega)

Rob Zellem
(Griffith)

Fall 2014 GTA Award to Sarah Peacock

Sarah Peacock is the recipient of the Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant Award for Fall 2014. Sarah earned the award for her work as a GTA with Dr.

spring 2015 Graduate Student News

Fall 2014 GTA Award to Sarah Peacock

Sarah Peacock is the recipient of the Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant Award for Fall 2014. Sarah earned the award for her work as a GTA with Dr. Steven Kortenkamp in the PTYS/ASTR 206 course. She is a second-year graduate student working with Associate Professor Travis Barman.

The students that Sarah worked with nominated her as deserving for going "above and beyond," communicating enthusiasm for course content as well as for her own research, and crediting her with their success in the course. Dr. Kortenkamp cites a special challenge for Sarah and her fellow PTYS 206 GTA: having to learn and operate the new full-dome digital projection system at Flandrau, where the course is taught. When not under the Flandrau dome, Sarah  proctored regular evening observing sessions, held bi-weekly one-on-one tutoring sessions and group help sessions, and organized a special project that connected the undergraduate students with the LPL Art of Planetary Science exhibition by encouraging students to submit pieces to the show for extra credit. Sarah believes "that the show was a great way to make planetary science more accessible" to the students.

Recipients of the Outstanding GTA Award receive funds of up to $1,000 to support travel to a professional meeting of their choice.

More Student Honors and Awards

Recent alumna Ingrid Daubar (2014) was the recipient of one of four Wiley-Blackwell Awards for outstanding presentations by students at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society in Casablanca for her talk on "New Dated Impacts on Mars and the Current Cratering Rate."

spring 2015 Graduate Student News

More Student Honors and Awards

Recent alumna Ingrid Daubar (2014) was the recipient of one of four Wiley-Blackwell Awards for outstanding presentations by students at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society in Casablanca for her talk on "New Dated Impacts on Mars and the Current Cratering Rate."

Catherine Elder (advisor: Adam Showman) and James Keane (advisor: Isamu Matsuyama) each received a 2014 AGU Outstanding Student Paper Award. Catherine won for her paper titled, "Convection and Melt Migration in Io’s Mantle." James received the award for a poster titled, "The Contribution of Impact Basins and Mascons to the Lunar Figure: Evidence for Lunar True Polar Wander, and a Past Low-Eccentricity, Synchronous Lunar Orbit." Typically the top 3-5% of presenters in each section/focus group are awarded an Outstanding Student Paper Award.

Sarah Morrison (advisor: Kaitlin Kratter) advanced to the semi-final round of the 2015 UA Grad Slam competition. Sarah's Grad Slam topic was: “Mind the Gap: Hunting for Exoplanets." Grad Slam is a campus-wide competition for the best 3-minute talk about student research and discovery. All disciplines are encouraged to participate. More information and video about Grad Slam is online from UA News.

Sarah Peacock (advisor: Travis Barman) was included on the NSF Honorable Mention list for her Graduate Research Fellowship Program proposal. Although she did not receive a GRFP, Sarah’s name will be listed on the GRFP web site and she will be provided with enhanced access to cyberinfrastructure resources, including supercomputing time, in support of research toward completion of the graduate program of study.

Michelle Thompson (advisor: Tom Zega) was first author on a paper in Earth, Planets and Space that was named by the journal as one of their highlighted papers for 2014. The paper, titled, "Microchemical and structural evidence for space weathering in soils from asteroid Itokawa," was co-authored by Roy Christoffersen, Thomas J. Zega, and Lindsay P. Keller; Earth, Planets and Space (2014) 66:89 (13 August 2014).

Student Honors and Awards

Three Ph.D. students with LPL affiliations were among the 11 winners of Uwingu travel grants. Congratulations to Ingrid Daubar (advisor: Alfred McEwen), Catherine Elder (advisor: Adam Showman), and Johanna Teske (Dept. of Astronomy, advised by Caitlin Griffith).

fall 2014 Graduate Student News

Student Honors and Awards

Three Ph.D. students with LPL affiliations were among the 11 winners of Uwingu travel grants. Congratulations to Ingrid Daubar (advisor: Alfred McEwen), Catherine Elder (advisor: Adam Showman), and Johanna Teske (Dept. of Astronomy, advised by Caitlin Griffith).

Kudos to Michelle Thompson (advisor: Tom Zega), who received Honorable Mention in the Geological Society of America's Stephen E. Dwornik Geoscience Student Paper Award for her talk titled, “Nanoscale Analysis of Space-Weathering Features in Soils from Itokawa," presented at the 45th annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

 

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